Syria Regional Refugee Response
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Settlement type: Refugee Camp
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35,200 Individuals
Total Persons of Concern
Base Layer

Population

This map does not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations

Total Persons of Concern

79,013


Last Updated 16 Nov 2017


Source - UNHCR

Demography
Male (50.4%) Age (49.6%) Female
10.1% 0 - 4 9.5%
11.3% 5 - 11 10.7%
7.4% 12 - 17 6.9%
20.5% 18 - 59 20.9%
1.1% 60 + 1.5%
PLEASE NOTE: These statistics are based on active registrations in the UNHCR database. Users are cautioned that the actual population is subject to uncertainties including incomplete camp departure information and other variables. UNHCR and its partners are implementing measures to improve the registration accuracy.
On July 10th, 10,707 individuals were inactivated for the following reasons:
- Absent from Camp/Current location unknown
- Bailed Out
- Registered in Urban Location/Registration appointment in urban locations
- Return to Country of Origin

   Latest Documents

21 Nov 2017
There are an estimated 120,000 Syrian refugees between the ages of 15-24 years currently in Jordan, with over 16,000 of these youth living in Zaatari, Azraq and the Emirati-Jordanian camps . In these camps, humanitarian actors are working to provide opportunities for Syrian children and youth to continue education, whether formal or informal (IFE), and support youth to actively participate in their communities. NRC operates Youth Training Centres supported by UNICEF in all three camps, which provide students aged between 15 and 32 years (and 15-35 in EJC) with three-month post basic training courses. Courses offered are based on youth interests and participatory assessments and include tailoring, barbering and beautician skills, electrical wiring, welding, office management and certified ICDL (IT) courses. All youth also take comprehensive courses in Arabic, Maths, English and Life Skills and engage in a range of sports and other recreational activities. Day care facilities in the Zaatari and Azraq centres enable teachers and students with children aged 2 to 5 years to attend, which has been recorded as having a particularly positive impact on levels of female participation. However, the need for a comprehensive youth assessment to understand the extent to which youth benefit from these programmes, and are able to utilize their skills and engage in income earning opportunities has been identified. Syrian refugee camps in Jordan host a relatively high youth population. As such, after four years of camp presences, there has been a variety of targeted programming provided to this demographic. Now entering the sixth year of this protracted crisis, the need for a comprehensive assessment of the sustainability of youth programming that encompasses both youth experiences, as well as programmatic impact, has been identified. Specifically, there is a lack of information regarding the extent to which youth benefit from these programmes, and are able to utilize skills learnt and engage in income-earning opportunities. This information gap corresponds with an increasing focus on Syrian youth issues within the humanitarian response, such as in Protection and Education sectors, as well as the need to focus on programme quality, relevance and sustainability. Youth in the camps face diverse challenges. Also within the camps the situation for youth, in terms of both programmes provided and barriers to access, differs based on their age group, gender, socio-economic circumstances, location, and other determinants. Youth have highlighted the need for accredited learning and tertiary education provision. Furthermore, recent development in Jordanian law has highlighted the need for relevant programming with regards to livelihoods opportunities . Protection, CP and SGBV concerns on youth include early marriage, psychosocial support and access to reproductive health services . Youth with disabilities have been highlighted as being particularly vulnerable, with further provision of targeted services required . Despite these challenges, youth are increasingly viewed as a valuable resource with skills and competencies to contribute to their camp communities, such as through volunteering. Further, youth experiences in Zaatari, EJC, and Azraq differ due to the camp contexts and services provided. The three camps included in this study differ in terms of provision of opportunities for youth and the camp community in general. Zaatari, EJC and Azraq camps are diverse in terms of population size and operational duration, provision of youth targeted programmes and other education and community services. In order to gauge the impact of this diversity of contexts, a key objective of the assessment will be to conduct a comparative analysis of youth experiences with, and the impact of, youth programming across Zaatari, EJC, and Azraq camps. This assessment of youth programming will not be exclusive to NRC/UNICEF programming, but evaluate all opportunities in which participants are engaged. The project has a planned duration of eight weeks, inclusive of data collection, data cleaning and analysis, production of an analytical report of key findings, and presentations of these findings to relevant sectoral working groups and other camp coordination forums.
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21 Nov 2017
CGAP/GIZ recently launched mobile money services in Jordan, and are hoping to launch P2P payment services later in 2016.CGAP/GIZ plan to use the study to inform the development of their peer-to-peer payment systems that they plan to launch in Jordan the fall. The Demand Survey, which is undertaken by Ipsos to provide a landscape and analysis of demand for P2P* financial services among low-income Jordanians and Syrian refugees, as well as other key indicators on access to finance, financial inclusion, and remittances*. The goal of this survey is to produce recommendations for financial products to be launched by CGAP/GIZ and provide a baseline survey for use of these products and mobile money more generally for future work by GIZ. The demand study will feed into recommendations in several ways: Assess use of current digital payment products (frequency, total value, overall use). Provide forecasting for future use of digital payment products. Examine current behaviors and opinions towards digital payment products and suggest ways they may be shift-able. Offer suggestions for how populations could or should be informed of digital payment products. Make recommendations on product content, mode, offerer, and design
Download (2.1 MB)

  Upcoming Events


Tuesday, 28th November 2017

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Zaatari Camp Management and Coordination(CMC) Meeting
Location: Conference room 1
Chaired By: Hashim M.E.M. Sharief (sharief@unhcr.org)
Contact: Wisam Al-Hasanat (alhasana@unhcr.org)




Tuesday, 12th December 2017

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Zaatari Camp Management and Coordination(CMC) Meeting
Location: Conference room 1
Chaired By: Hashim M.E.M. Sharief (sharief@unhcr.org)
Contact: Wisam Al-Hasanat (alhasana@unhcr.org)




Tuesday, 26th December 2017

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Zaatari Camp Management and Coordination(CMC) Meeting
Location: Conference room 1
Chaired By: Hashim M.E.M. Sharief (sharief@unhcr.org)
Contact: Wisam Al-Hasanat (alhasana@unhcr.org)




Tuesday, 9th January 2018

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Coordination & Management Camp Meeting
Location: Zaatari Base Camp Room # 1
Chaired By: Hashim Shareif Camp Manager
Contact: Wisam Al Hasanat (ALHASANA@UNHCR.ORG) 0790039170




1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Camp Management & Coordination Meeting (CMC)
Location: Zaatari Base Camp Room # 1
Chaired By: Hashim Shareif Camp Manager
Contact: Wisam Al Hasanat (ALHASANA@UNHCR.ORG) 0790039170





Tuesday, 23rd January 2018

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Camp Management & Coordination Meeting (CMC)
Location: Zaatari Base Camp Room # 1
Chaired By: Hashim Shareif Camp Manager
Contact: Wisam Al Hasanat (ALHASANA@UNHCR.ORG) 0790039170





  Who's Doing What Where?

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UNHCR
Child Protection
FCA
IMC
IRC
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NHF
UNFPA
UNHCR
UNICEF
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UNHCR
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JEN
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Education
Children without borders-KnK
FCA
IRD
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MoE Jordan
RI
SC
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UNICEF
Food Security
SC
UNHCR
WFP
Gender-Based Violence
IRC
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UNFPA
UNHCR
UNICEF
Health
IMC
IRC
IRD
JHAS
MdM
MoH Jordan
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SC
UNHCR
UNICEF
Mental Health and Psychosocial Support
IMC
NHF
Nutrition
UNHCR
Protection
IMC
IRC
IRD
LWF
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UNFPA
UNHCR
UNICEF
UNWOMEN
Registration
UNHCR
Reproductive Health
UNFPA
Shelter
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UNOPS
Water & Sanitation
ACTED Jordan
JEN
OXFAM
UNHCR
UNICEF

  Settlement Descriptive Information

Pattern in population change
Zaatari was first opened on July 28, 2012 and has grown exponentially ever since.
Areas of origin
The majority of refuees in the camp are from Da'ara Governorate in Syria
Tips for humanitarians
Camp mapping data can be extracted from OpenStreetmap @ http://export.hotosm.org/en/jobs/6968. More information on Camp Mapping @ https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Refugee_Camp_Mapping
Administrative structure
The camp is under the joint administration of the Jordanian Government and UNHCR.

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