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WASH Working Group - Jordan

The WASH sector aims to provide water, sanitation and hygiene services to affected populations of the Syrian refugee crisis in camp and non-camp settings. The key objectives of the WASH sector in Jordan are as follows: 1) to ensure safe, equitable and sustainable access to a sufficient quantity of water for drinking, cooking, personal and domestic hygiene practices; 2) to provide safe and appropriate sanitation facilities; 3) to minimize the risk of WASH related diseases through access to improved hygienic practices, hygiene promotion and delivery of hygienic products and services on a sustainable and equitable basis; and 4) to establish and maintain effective mechanisms for WASH coordination at national and sub-national levels. The WASH response is designed to respect a list of WASH minimum standards and requirements for water supply, hygiene, sanitation, and WASH in camp and non-camp settings. These standards are based on national standards, Sphere standards, UNHCR WASH standards for refugees and have been agreed by all WASH partners including the Government of Jordan. The WASH working group is chaired by UNICEF.

   Latest Documents

Report Date: 23/11/2017
Description
Since 2011, a total of 656,170 Syrians have registered as refugees in Jordan; 79,937 of whom are currently registered in Zaatari camp, in Mafraq governorate.1 UNICEF is the lead agency for the WASH sector in Jordan, coordinating all related activities within the camp since it opened in 2012. ACTED, JEN and Oxfam have operated as key partners in the implementation of WASH activities in the camp, including delivery of treated water through a free water trucking service, the collection of waste water and solid waste, building and repair and maintenance of private WASH facilities, and hygiene promotion activities. Six years after the onset of the Syrian crisis, UNICEF, in coordination with these humanitarian organisations, has been shifting towards greater sustainability of programming. This is seen most evidently in the construction of the Zaatari Wastewater Network (WWN), which has connected every household in the camp to a common wastewater disposal system, and the simultaneous construction of private toilet facilities in each household, as a more cost-efficient and sustainable solution to WASH needs than communal facilities. This research sought to evaluate the impact of the wastewater management project conducted by UNICEF and its implementing partners on sanitation and hygiene practices in Zaatari camp, and camp residents’ perception of the adequacy of this, so as to inform future programming. This survey was divided into two phases, the first of which aimed to a) identify primary household sources of drinking water; b) assess the prevalence and suitability of private WASH infrastructure across all households;2 c) record primary wastewater and solid waste disposal practices across all households in the camp; and d) gauge perceptions of adequacy of WASH repair and maintenance (R&M) services amongst the refugee community. To supplement the assessment of private WASH infrastructure, phase two monitored structural damage to communal sewage interceptor tanks in the camp and explored reasons for damage and community awareness of potential related hygiene risks. From 12 February to 5 March 2017, a team of two REACH Project Officers and 37 Syrian cash for workers (CfW)3 assessed 12,410 households, consisting of 15,165 cases 4, and a total of 68,221 individuals that were present in the camp at the time of data collection.5 As a first step, the state of communal sewage interceptor tanks6 was evaluated. Based on these results, key Informant (KI) interviews were conducted in each of the twelve districts of the camp on the 19th and 20th of March 2017. 7 They targeted particularly the blocks where Phase 1 concrete tanks have been the most damaged so as to understand the underlying reasons for these damages. This assessment showed that the WASH programming of UNICEF and partners in Zaatari has increased the number of households with private WASH infrastructure. This implies that the shift towards longer-term, sustainable WASH programming has been successful through the construction of a waste water network and private infrastructure that has covered the camp comprehensively and been positively perceived by beneficiaries. However, there are several key gaps that emerged. In order to achieve a greater impact in terms of sanitary situation in the camp, a greater effort to tackle issues of network blockages or tank overflowing needs to be made. As Key Informants reported that the households residing in their areas were not willing or able to pay for plumber to fix households connections and septic tank issues, another solution has to be found to maintain the WWN in good condition in the long term. Given that almost one quarter of households reported that they did not know the primary WASH actor in their district, expanding outreach and beneficiary communications would ensure greater transparency and facilitate the reporting of WASH related problems towards rectifying these issues. 1 UNHCR, Inter-agency information sharing portal, last updated 16 February 2017, accessed 9 March 2017. 2 Suitability of private toilets was based on household self-reporting on 5 criteria determined by UNICEF: a network connection/ Phase 1 concrete tank, impermeable flooring, a hand-washing facility and water drainage solution, and permanent walls or curtains. 3 The cash for work (CFW) scheme in Zaatari camp has been utilized since the camp was established in July 2012, as a means to provide incentives and capacity development to refugees who volunteer for various organisations in the camp. For this assessment, REACH recruited 39 cash for workers to complete this large-scale data collection exercise, who were then supervised by REACH field staff. 4 ‘Household’ is defined as either a single or a collection of shelters inhabited by a UNHCR registered case or multiple UNHCR registered cases who share resources. The head of household is defined as holding primary responsibility for household financial resources and decision-making. A ‘case is considered the principal family unit upon registration as a ‘person(s) of concern’ with UNHCR. 5 All households in the camp were approached. Where no respondent was available, a further two additional visits were conducted on different days and at different times to allow the opportunity to be included. 914 households in the camp were not able to be assessed after three attempts by enumerators. Findings are thus representative of the assessed camp population at the time of data collection, and are not necessarily reflective of the entire camp population. 6 These are prefabricated reinforced concrete (PRC) circular tanks. They are partitioned to allow solids to be trapped in one compartment and liquid (solid free) to over flow into the other chamber and into the network downstream. The interceptor tanks are of 8m3, 4m3 and 2.5m3 capacities. 7 Zaatari camp is divided into 12 districts, which are subdivided into blocks. The delineations were made with the purpose of designing a household address
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  Who's Doing What Where?

Azraq Camp
RI
THW Jordan
UNHCR Jordan
UNICEF - Jordan
WVI
Cyber City Refugee Camp
UNICEF - Jordan
Irbid
ACF - Jordan
IRD Jordan
JEN
RI
UNICEF - Jordan
King Abdullah Park Refugee Camp
UNICEF - Jordan
Mafraq
IRD Jordan
RI
UNHCR Jordan
UNICEF - Jordan
Zaatari Refugee Camp
ACTED
JEN
Oxfam - Jordan
UNHCR Jordan
UNICEF - Jordan
Zarqa
JEN
Oxfam - Jordan
UNICEF - Jordan
WVI



Working Group Chairs

UNICEF MENA Regional Office Jordan | United Nations Children's Fund

  Key Contacts


Full Name Esmaeil Ibrahmin
Partner Information Cheif of WASH Section
Email eibrahim@unicef.org
Phone Number +962 798608203
Skype ID esmael.ibrahim
Address UNICEF Jordan CO PO BOX 1551, Amman 11821
Organization United Nations Children's Fund

Full Name Shumet Amdemichael
Partner Information Head of WASH Department- WASH Co Chair
Email hodwash@jo.missions-acf.org
Phone Number 0778465104
Address ACF | Action Contre La Faim

  Sub-working Groups

  Highlights

Global Handwashing Day was celebrated in Zaatari and Azraq, to increase awareness and understanding about the importance of hand washing with soap as an effective and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives. Celebrations reached an estimated 5,532 people in camps.
19 Nov 2017
30 Sep 2016: Essential WASH services were provided to approx 134,468 people, including an estimated 87,511 children, living in Zaatari, Azraq & Cyber City camps
07 Nov 2016
UNICEF/WASH: Equipping and connecting the two wells in Dafiyana and Abu Al Farth is 80% completed
22 Nov 2015
Unicef and partners completed the rehabilitation of Zarqa water pumping station which is now benefiting approximately 505,000 people.
12 Jul 2015
Through UNICEF and partners, 505,000 people in Zarqa now have improved access to municipal water services as a result of the rehabilitation works undertaken.
15 Jun 2015
The National WASH in Schools assessment has been completed in 3174 schools
19 May 2015