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REACH household assessment of Syrians living in the host communities of Northern Jordan

Status: widgets.needs_assessment.status.4 1 October 2013 - 1 November 2013
Not funded
Methodology: widgets.needs_assessment.status.2, widgets.needs_assessment.status.5
Methodology description: HH survey disaggregated by community (BSU/"Manteqa"), focus groups and stakeholder interviews (check numbers)
Sampling: widgets.needs_assessment.sampling.4
Sampling size:
Target population: widgets.needs_assessment.target_population.7

REACH household assessment of Syrians living in the host communities of Northern Jordan

Status: widgets.needs_assessment.status.4 1 October 2013 - 1 November 2013
Not funded
Methodology: widgets.needs_assessment.methodology.2, widgets.needs_assessment.methodology.5
Methodology description: HH survey disaggregated by community (BSU/"Manteqa"), focus groups and stakeholder interviews (check numbers)
Sampling: widgets.needs_assessment.sampling.4
Sampling size:
Target population: widgets.needs_assessment.target_population.7
o gain an in-depth understanding of issues related to sector specific and municipal services. To inform more effective humanitarian planning and interventions which target the needs of Syrian refugees in Jordanian host communities.

needs_assessment.single.needsDescription
Provide targeted support for vulnerable individuals, including particular emphasis on unaccompanied/separated minors residing with Syrian or Jordanian families, as well as those coping alone or with groups of other unaccompanied/separated minors. Provide support to water and sanitation infrastructure at the community level, particularly where existing networks are being depleted or not reaching vulnerable populations. Where there are pockets of sanitation and health related issues, this assistance should be complimented by a strong hygiene promotion component. Provide public information about what services refugees are entitled to in particular considering health and education. More information may be needed regarding how to re-register, as well as research into potential barriers preventing registration in host communities. Increase support for municipalities and communities, targeting social services that are under the greatest level of stress. This includes solid waste management, electricity, cleanliness, education and health. By supporting existing institutions, resilience can be improved, leaving these better able to cope with the shocks of the Syrian crisis. Implement targeted household food security and nutritional awareness interventions, particularly in rural areas, to ensure that the most vulnerable can meet their immediate food needs. Encourage greater cooperation, social cohesion and engagement across communities to reduce tensions. Main Findings:

needs_assessment.single.mainFindings
The greatest challenge faced by Syrian refugees is access to cash, specifically cash for rent, followed by access to food assistance and non-food items for the winter season. The majority of Syrian refugees live in rented accommodation in areas where they usually have adequate access to municipal services but tend to have higher renting costs than Jordanian households. Many Syrian refugee children of secondary school-age are not attending school in order to work – particularly in the urban centres of Irbid and Al Mafraq – two of the districts where Syrian refugees were found most likely to be living in rented accommodation. There is a low uptake of health services by Syrian refugee households living in these areas too due to constraints such as distance, costs and transport, even in urban areas. The situation of Syrian refugees in the rural areas of Jordan is different compared to urban centres. In Al Shoona Al-Janoobidya and Al-Basha Districts in Balqa Governorate, a high proportion of Syrian refugee households are living in tents. The seasonal economic migration that took place before the crisis, where Syrian agricultural workers would live in tents in Jordan throughout the harvest season, has now been replaced by longer-term cross-border displacement. As a result, the seasonal encampments have significantly increased in size and have become fixed tented settlements hosting Syrian refugee households. Access to health services by Syrian refugees is significantly lower in these districts compared to others, as are the rates of primary and secondary school attendance.. The ongoing influx of refugees from Syria into Jordan is placing a heavy burden on already strained services and resources in Jordanian host communities. The pressure on education services is immense, despite many children not attending school to instead seek employment opportunities to meet basic household needs. . Moreover, Jordan’s limited water resources and sanitation services are under pressure with the additional demand of over 550,000 refugees, while access for the most vulnerable remains a concern due to high water prices and limited access in more remote areas. Access to shelter is of significant concern for refugees, as housing stocks are limited and rent prices continue to increase for both Jordanians and Syrians.

needs_assessment.single.sectors

  •  Emergency Shelter and NFI
  •  Education
  •  Cash Assistance
  •  Child Protection

needs_assessment.single.locations

  • Jordan
  • Irbid Governorate
  • Mafraq Governorate
  • Mafraq
  • Jarash Governorate
  • Ajlun Governorate
  • Syrian Arab Republic