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Rapid Assessment

Status: Published 1 June 2012 - 1 July 2012
Not funded
Methodology: Data collection started
Methodology description: Mixed method approach. Questionnaires and focus group discussions.
Sampling: Random
Sampling size:
Target population: Host Communities

Rapid Assessment

Status: Published 1 June 2012 - 1 July 2012
Not funded
Methodology: Focus Group Discussion
Methodology description: Mixed method approach. Questionnaires and focus group discussions.
Sampling: Random
Sampling size:
Target population: Host Communities
To develop a more precise understanding of the shelter needs and overall livelihood security of Syrian refugees residing in CHF’s current area of operation, and to enhance the country program’s ability to provide relevant assistance were gaps remain.

Needs
1. Host-family Shelter Support—Efforts should be made to improve the availability and sustainability of host family accommodation for refugees. Host-family shelter options could be increased through a number of incentives, ranging from general maintenance to improve the suitability of existing accommodations. 2. Income Generation—Humanitarian interventions emphasize improving the livelihood security of the displaced, especially for households without host-family support. Cash-for-work initiatives would provide a much needed infusion of cash resources for especially vulnerable houses, and could be linked to other assistance activities, such construction works associated with host-family shelter renovations. Income generating opportunities could consider including vulnerable participants from the host population. 3. Remedial/informal Education—Class-based tutoring opportunities should be provided in rural districts, especially in those communities hosting large concentrations of school-aged refugee children. Remedial education services should be available beyond the beginning of the semester, in anticipation of new refugee arrivals through the end of the year and beyond.

Main Findings
1. Demographic Details - Average household size among the respondent refugee population was approximately six individuals, while the average number of children under 18 years was approximately three per family. Average family size among host respondents was approximately 7 individuals, while the average number of children under 18 was approximately three per family. Nearly all refugee respondents report having been registered by UNHCR, but the majority of refugees were unclear what assistance and/or services were available for their families other than basic health care services. Respondents appear to prioritize income related needs above other basic services, ranking rental support and the need for employment opportunities above food assistance or other basic services. 2. Shelter - Majority of Syrian refugees shelter in Jordan are currently renting accommodation for their families. 91.6% of respondents listed shelter assistance as a critical need. On average a refugee family can expect to pay approximately JD150 to rent a two bedroom flat for one month. Refugee families are remaining on average 4.3 months in a given residence, and 45% of respondents had relocated at least once since arriving in Jordan. Respondents were clearly expecting to remain displaced for the foreseeable future and were unclear how they would continue to cover household costs as their displacement continues into the winter period. 3. Livelihood - It is estimated that an average sized family could expect to spend JD320 a month to cover household expenses, excluding rent. The majority of survey respondents report that they have been unable to find work (58%), or rely on charity as their principle source of income (31%). Focus group participants in all three governorates report that wages for Syrian refugees had fallen below standard market rates in their localities. 95% of survey respondents report no remaining household savings. All survey respondents indicate that they have received food assistance from local charities, while 77% had received household/Non-food items. 68.7% report having benefited from cash assistance, though the value and frequency of cash transfers varied considerably, ranging from one-time distributions of JD20 to larger sums sufficient to cover household expenses for two months or more. 4. Education - 58% of survey respondents indicated that they had school aged children in their households, of which only one child was reported to be enrolled in the Jordanian school system. 85.7% of respondents report that their school aged children had fallen behind in their studies. Only one survey participant had reported receiving remedial education for a child that had fallen behind in her studies. At least one instance of school-aged children being put to work to assist with their household’s livelihood was identified.

Partners


Sectors

  •  Emergency Shelter and NFI
  •  Education
  •  Cash Assistance
  •  Livelihood & Social cohesion
  •  Child Protection

Locations

  • Jordan
  • Irbid Governorate
  • Amman Governorate
  • Mafraq Governorate
  • Mafraq
  • Syrian Arab Republic

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