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The Humanitarian Response to the Syrian Refugee Crisis in Jordan

Status: Published 1 December 2013 - 1 December 2013
Not funded
Sampling: Random
Sampling size: NA
Target population: Population in Camp, Urban / Rural Population

The Humanitarian Response to the Syrian Refugee Crisis in Jordan

Status: Published 1 December 2013 - 1 December 2013
Not funded
Sampling: Random
Sampling size: NA
Target population: Population in Camp, Urban / Rural Population
Identify how the humanitarian community was integrating existing gender guidance across all sectors and whether gender was being dealt with centrally as an institutionalized way of working rather than peripherally. Look at the ways in which humanitarian agencies assessed these needs and planned their programs. Asked questions about the opportunities and good practices and models for promoting gender equality and women's empowerment.

Priorities
Multi-sectoral-please see inside report

Needs
Empower women and girls through: working with local women's rights organizations that have the political vision and know how; building the capacity of refugee women and girls, as well as local activists and staff, to speak on their own behalf and strategize collectively;and creating safe spaces to address protection issues and increase access to information services. Support host communities, as well as refugees through: longer-term planning for continued change, projects that benefit host communities to reduce tensions, building local capacity of community organizers and service providers, establishing community centers and working with local community-based organizations to address local challenges, create working spaces for collective collaboration and increase access to information and services. Engage refugees in identifying problems and adequate solutions through: leadership development and capacity building, relationship building, working with Syrian refugees as volunteers and conducting door-to-door assessments and distributions. Advance gender mainstreaming through: gathering and using sex- and age-disaggregated data, conducting gender analysis and using it to plan programs, going beyond needs to focus on empowerment and potential, incorporating GenCap advisors into humanitarian crisis responses from the very beginning, creating and training on standard operating procedures and processes for protection, adopting internal gender strategy that fully transforms organization structurally and programmatically and incorporating gender-based violence and child protection mechanisms into all programs.

Main Findings
Multi-sectoral. Briefly, the research has found that certain populations receive less attention and less access to programs, including the elderly, women and girls living outside the campls, people with disabilities and sexual minorities. In addition, there was a scarcity of specialist services to support Syrian men, who face their own anxieties as a result of the lack of work and failure to fulfill their breadwinner and protector roles, and who are at constant risk of being drawn into the war. Gender impacts the ability to access information and thus access services. Finally, accountability and follow up in referral pathways for child protection and gender-based violence concerns continue to be major challenges.

Sectors

  •  Health
  •  Water Sanitation Hygiene
  •  Protection
  •  Food Security
  •  Emergency Shelter and NFI
  •  Education
  •  Core Relief Items (CRIs)

Locations

  • Jordan
  • Zarqa Governorate
  • Irbid Governorate
  • Amman Governorate
  • Mafraq Governorate
  • Mafraq
  • Syrian Arab Republic

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